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20121211
20121211
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about the fiscal cliff, that is obvious. everybody is sitting back and waiting to see if washington can actually get something done. if political agendas can get it aside and think about the devastation that probably occurred with the fiscal cliff. the spring selling season begins in late january. we have been the bright spot in the economy. our industry are creating jobs, we're coming back in the early stages of a recovery so the fiscal cliff january 1 would have a huge impact on the country, and impact on our business, and we have our fingers crossed and are very hopeful washington can get something done and we'll have to see. but if they don't, there is no question there will be a little bit of time until things settle down when the buyers will hit the sidelines. liz: will it derail the tentative recovery here? >> right now we are three weeks away from this fiscal cliff date and we're still selling houses. i don't think it derails it, but there could be a pause until things get worked out. liz: part of it is being discussed, and that is the possible elimination or at least the cuttin
day we're a little closer to the fiscal cliff. every day republicans are here, speaker boehner is here, leader mcconnel is here, lead ready to negotiate, ready to deal, ready to do something that will avoid what everybody agrees would be a disaster and yet the president seems to be content with just traveling around the country doing a victory lap or something at the very time he ought to be here in washington, d.c. sitting down across tremendous table -- across the table from the people who can help us avoid what would be a very, very bad situation for our country economically. it's about jobs and the economy, mr. president. you said it, ewe agree with that, now let's get to work and try to fix it. >> for people who spent a lifetime spilleding a small business in a community, and small communities around the country have a dry cleaner a florist, a car wash, those small businesses will be impacted by the change in the death tax that occurs on january 1. many will not be able to continue to hold that business in the family if they have to pay 55% of every -- of everything in value over
's not what the american people thought the fiscal cliff was about. they thought it was about trying to have something to force us, force our congress and our president to do something about the deficit and debt situation. everything they're talking about will make it worse. >> what's the answer? will we have the deal? >> the real answer is to have comprehensive. look at this. i as a republican, i would take raising the rates on the two top brackets if, in return, we had tax reform laid out over a period of months, if we had entitlement reform. we have to control defense spending. we have to control other no non- -- other discretionary non-defense spending. i think if you have the whole package, i would hold my nose despite the fact raising those two tax brackets is bad economics, bad for jobs, will hurt the economy, i would hold my nose to get the other done. what i wouldn't do is vote for that and do nothing else. >> agree completely. what i've been saying here. steve rattner. >> i agree completely. to get a big deal we all have to hold our nose a little bit and accept things we don't want
a business network, i have to ask you, you're a businessman. does this fiscal cliff stuff worry you and the prospect of higher taxes worry you? what do you think? >> i think it worries all of us, doesn't it? i'm one that has faith. i believe something is going to happen. i believe we'll have a deal before it gets over the cliff personally. i'm an optimist. >> you're in farming. you have a guesthouse on your land down in georgia. what do you your customers tell you about the state of the economy? >> we get varying points of view from the discussions we have at the plantation. again, i think the majority of folks that come and, you know, have discussions of all types, especially when it gets to the economy, they are optimists and they feel like the country is getting better, albeit more slowly than we would all like. but i think the overall feeling is that it's going to be okay. just take a deep breath, move forward. >> let's turn to music, shall we, steve, come on. >> if you don't know one of the things he's famous for, rolling stones, 1982 but the most classic piano solo in the hist
. and -- >> but for everybody to -- to do that, to say we have to go over this fiscal cliff -- >> we don't have to -- >> in order so that everybody -- >> you could have legislation ready to introduce that week. >> congressman hensarling, before you go, something like that, would -- i mean i hear this from both sides, that if we just go over the president would introduce this legislation to lower rates, republicans who have signed grover norquist's pledge would be able to go along with that and say this is what we did. i didn't vote to raise taxes, i voted to lower taxes. is that the most likely scenario? >> makes sense? >> i'm not a las vegas bookie so i'm not going to say what is most likely scenario. i don't know and my crystal ball is a little fuzzy. again all this talk of taxes is marginally irrelevant. you give the president all of the tax increases that he has requested it's roughly about 23% of his ten-year spending budget. even 1.6 trillion. at most is maybe, 22%, 23%. the additional -- >> but going over that cliff, that's real money. and by the way, that's not that revenue thing. that'
and decided to roll a debt ceiling extension in to the fiscal cliff deal whatever they end up striking here and seems to me acknowledging republicans have leverage with cpi and talking about raising the medicare age. my question to you as a progressive is, republicans want something big. is there any big concessions you can see acceptable? >> new york city i really can't. and the kind of things we are talking about, even if they're not -- may not be acceptable to me ever but talking about a version of the changed cpi, the president already said social security is off the table because it is not driving the deficit. that's kind of weird. changes to medicare eligibility again or changes to medicare payments or whatever, it's really complicated to negotiate but i have to say i agree with you, steve. i'm -- i wish that the president hadn't taken the 14th amendment off the table because we're all saying, well, nothing should be off the table. why is that off the table and even if it's tough thing to pull off in the long run? i think that this mania for a fiscal cliff deal is disturbing but i thi
's on all of our minds here, the fiscal cliff. and i would be remiss if i didn't ask you both to weigh in on it. but in the following way, number one, what's going on that we don't understand? number two, what should happen? number three, what's the r.s.c. going to do to help us get to that better state of what should happen? either one of you wants to chime in on that one? >> first of all, you know, if you look at where we are right now, it's because of a number of reasons. jim touched on a few of them, going back to the debt ceiling deal. i did not vote for the budget control act. to me it didn't address the real problem and that's spending. if you look at the debate right now, it's mostly about the debate of how much faxes we need to raise. the president keeps adding more to it because he has an insatiablet appetite to add more. we are not addressing the real problem. i don't think anybody's taxes need to go up. you look at what barack obama said three years ago. if you raise taxes in a bad economy it will make things worse. we're still in a bad economy. why would we want to do thin
today. it's over. why inject the politics? why go there? with so much going on, the fiscal cliff, negotiating back and forth with the house trying to figure out how to avoid massive tax increases and spending cuts, why there? it's all politics. >> steve: one other note, the "wall street journal" says regarding right to work states, between 2000 and 2010, 5 million people moved from union states to right to work states and they have 23% higher rate of income growth per capita in right to work states. so things are thriving in the right to work states. there are 24 of them. 26 still are union states. >> gretchen: eric brought up an interesting point about why isn't the president staying in washington, because now it turns out that the fiscal cliff is actually closer than we thought. it was not coakley january 1 anymore. we've about to go off it any day now because apparently it takes a certain amount of days to actually draft any kind of legislation that they might come to an agreement on and so if you backtrack then from the end of the year and when congress is going to be going h
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8